Story County Genealogical Society
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Story County Genealogical Society
Story County, Iowa, USA
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Ancestry DNA results changes

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Ancestry DNA results changes
Posted: 11/07/2018 - 9:09 pm
Several months ago Ancestry revised the ethnicity results from their DNA tests.  Ancestry now has 16,000 reference DNA's compared to only 3,000 previously.  My results changed a lot.  My Iberian (Spain/Portugal) disappeared.  Also my Southern Europe (Italy/Greece) disappeared.  My Irish (now Ireland & Scotland) went from 31% to only 8%.  My 12% Scandinavian is now 7 percent Swedish and 6% Baltic States (Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania).  To a considerable extent the revised results seem more in line with what I have actually found researching my ancestors.  I am surprised by the 6% Baltic States; also by 3% Norway, tho one of my Swedish ancestors came from a parish not far from the border with Norway.   I now suspect that my father's German ancestors may have been less German than we had thought. (The National Geographic DNA test showed that my Y chromosome is most common in Poland - tho not common there.).  There was a large Sorbish/Wendish (slavic) minority living the the region along the Oder River where my great grandparents were born.  The village my great grandmother came from was originally called Niemaschklebo (of many different spellings) but under the German Empire (1871) was called Lindenhain.  I have seen photos taken in Niemaschklebo before 1945 showing street signs with street names in both German and Sorbish.  Since I got the initial ethnicity results from the Ancestry DNA test several years ago, I have discovered that some of my "Swedish" ancestors were born in Poland, France and Germany and moved to Sweden in the late 1500's and early 1600's.  I had already known about one "Swedish" ancestor whose Swedish death record plainly states that he was born in Germany.  Because of the very unsettled situation in northern Europe during the Reformation and then the Thirty Years War, many people moved to Sweden.  
- 7 Nov 2018 Paul Martsching